No, Burgundy Does NOT “Beat” the Stock Market

So. Much. STUPID!!!

Every year or so, I receive an unsolicited email blast from wine auction services that makes me want to Hulk rage. The 2019 incarnation of this comes my way from online auction house WineBid, is titled “16 Years of Burgundy vs. The Stock Market – and WineBid Auction Results,” and which I will only link to with the anchor text Probably Total Horseshit so as not to give them quite exactly the kind of organic social mention that they had in mind when they sent it.

In that WineBid article, which you probably shouldn’t bother reading, they make the claim that a report published by The Economist (using WineBid data) shows that “fine red Burgundy wine is a better investment by far than the stock market.”

Sorry, but that’s a steaming pile of horse crap of the tallest order.

Yes, they include cool-looking, impressive charts and lots of flowery language insinuating that if you love fine red wine then you’re an idiot for not considering it the world’s most impressive investment vehicle, so there’s that. But the problem is, well, that there are lots of problems with comparing the apples of proper investing to the oranges of owning fine wine, not to mention the issues with the report itself…

Here are a few of the concerns that you should have regarding this specious conclusion that Burgundy will be besting stock returns now or, like, ever:

Pretty much each time that I address this topic, I end it with the same cautionary tidbit, so I am just going to quote myself on one of the last ones I offered:

” If you’re contemplating any substantial move into the fine wine investment market, I’ve got three words for you: Don’t do it. And here, for good measure, are four more; remember that the four most dangerous words in any investment sphere are ‘this time it’s different…’ “

Cheers!

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at No, Burgundy Does NOT “Beat” the Stock Market from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For September 16, 2019

I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes in a “mini-review” format.
 
They are meant to be quirky, fun, and (mostly) easily-digestible reviews of (mostly) currently available wines (click here for the skinny on how to read them), and are presented links to help you find them, so that you can try them out for yourself. Cheers!

Grab The 1WineDude.com Tasting Guide and start getting more out of every glass of wine today!

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For September 16, 2019 from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

When It Comes to Wine, Big Isn’t Evil – It’s Essential

During the past couple of weeks or so, an online kerfuffle ensued after wine writer and author Jamie Goode posted an eye-opening article on his blog detailing the massive size of some of the wine worlds largest industrial-size producers. They are, interestingly (and in a sort-of-capitalism-run-amok fail), all owned by one company: Gallo.

Goode’s take on the situation in more on the informational side, but the online reactions were mostly pitchforks-and-torches negative, with the ire planted squarely in the “Big = Bad!” mindset.

My friend Fred Swan penned a cogent, even-handed, level-headed piece in response to the online outcry, in which he extols the virtues of industrial-scale wines in consumer terms:

“Aficionados of “fine wine” may find …affordable, high-volume, big-brand bottlings too bold, too sweet, too simple, or not varietally representative. The wines aren’t made for those people. They’re made for specific, but very large. audiences, are made with intention, and made after considerable research and development by highly-trained people.”

My response today, on the other hand, will be neither level-headed nor even-handed, though hopefully it will be cogent enough for the detractors of industrial-scale wine to understand that they are acting like morons when they lash out against high-volume, low-cost wines as having no place in a modern wine market. The truth is that those high-volume, low-cost wines make up the majority of the fine wine market, and without them the high-end market would likely be in severe economic dire straights…

Before I lay down the truth slapping, however, a clarification is in order.

Industrial scale wines are, on the whole, nowhere near as good as their (often) more expensive, (almost certainly) lower-production, (is this even really a word?) artisinal, and (usually) higher quality counterparts. I know this both from the standpoints of practical experience (in tasting thousands and thousands of wines per year in critically settings) and, more importantly, rational logic. For the latter, industrial wines are more likely, by necessity, to include less complex fruit, use more additives, and employ lower-cost methods of production.

A comparison will likely help here: there’s no shame in, say, enjoying a burger from McDonald’s; where we would make a huge mistake is in insisting that a McD’s burger is on the same quality level as a Kobe beef burger where the cows are massaged multiple times an hour and fed only hormone-free, wild grass species grown from rare seeds imported from Japan. You can prefer the McD’s burger, but you make a serious mistake if you consider it a better overall burger than the Kobe, all other things being equal.

Similarly, in wine we can get a tasty, clean, varietally-correct bottle for something like $5-$7 USD. It will not be made by farmers who wake with the dawn, go outside to feed the chickens, and then tend lovingly to their vines by hand. That’s the myth that fine wine markets to us, but the reality is that the costs of that kind of hand-tendered farming automatically would put the wine into a price category at least four times the entry-level cost above. Any other interpretation is simply an act of deluding yourself as a consumer, for which (in today’s age of instantly-available detailed information) there is little excuse.

Now that we have that out of the way, I can tell you that having a low-end market, in general, actually benefits the higher-end market in most economic cases, so the idea that the industrial-scale wine is somehow bad for the future of craft-level winemaking is probably a straw-man argument. to wit – a study by Ikuo Ishibashi and Noriaki Matsushima published in Marketing Science found that the competition level caused by lower-end products can be essential for maintaining the quality of higher-end products in the same market:

“The existence of price-sensitive consumers who care little about product quality intensifies competition among the high-end firms. The existence of low-end firms functions as a credible threat, which induces the high-end firms not to overproduce because price-sensitive consumers buy products from the low-end firms.”

Additionally, higher-end products may actually benefit at the expense of their lower-end competition, simply because the lower-end competition exists. That’s the finding of a London Business School and Georgetown University McDonough School of Business joint market study, anyway:

“…a consumer who is exposed to a dense set of alternatives (think now of the choice of coffee or yogurt at your local supermarket) concludes instead that like-minded consumers must care about even small differences in quality, so this consumer should follow suit.”

So… while their are undoubtedly issues with how wine is distributed in the USA due to largely unchecked capitalism and outdated laws, the mere existence of lower-end wines – which are essential for meeting consumer demand for such products, and provide an economic market base upon which the higher tiers of craft-level wine production relies and from which it organically grows what is likely a not insubstantial portion of its consumers – does not appear to hamper the high-end market anywhere near as much as its detractors claim, if it does so at all.

TLDR version (which, yeah, I unfairly stuck at the bottom): The high-end wine market needs the low-end wine market; without the latter, the former would probably not be as successful as it has been, and it probably actually benefits from the situation. get over it.

Cheers!

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at When It Comes to Wine, Big Isn’t Evil – It’s Essential from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For September 9, 2019

I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes in a “mini-review” format.
 
They are meant to be quirky, fun, and (mostly) easily-digestible reviews of (mostly) currently available wines (click here for the skinny on how to read them), and are presented links to help you find them, so that you can try them out for yourself. Cheers!

Grab The 1WineDude.com Tasting Guide and start getting more out of every glass of wine today!

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For September 9, 2019 from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)

Earlier this year, I happened to get invited to the 2019 Austrian Wine Summit because, well, I’m just that kind of lucky fellow these days. Since one should almost always begin with bubbles, it seems apt that my first foray into an Austrian wine feature would be about the official changes to their sparkling wine quality pyramid, and also end up being the kick-off piece for my new gig contributing to the Napa Valley Wine Academy’s online content stream.

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)
The author, being obnoxious.

You can head over to the NVWA website to get the skinny on the new Austrian Sekt designations, its history, and what it all potentially means for the fine wine sparkling import markets. You’ll want to hit that article first so that you get the context of the new Sekt pyramid levels, and because you’re just that kind of informed person who digs learning and not just drinking, right?

As for what the latest developments in Austria’s Österreichischer Sekt mit geschützter Ursprungsbezeichnung (g.U.) means for your mouth, I did have my boots on the ground, tasting through several examples in every level of the Sekt g.U. pyramid. In a Sekt vineyard. In the Weinweg Langenlois, which sports a panoramic vineyard viewing platform, riddling rack, charming little tasting huts, and a couple of hammocks. Go ahead and hate me, I even hated myself for a few minutes after experiencing that embarrassment of riches (if it’s any consolation, it did rain on us, cutting short the tasting by about five minutes… ok, forget it…).

Anyway, here are the highlights…

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)

Klassik

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)2017 Höllerer Alois Sekt Extra Brut Klassik (Niederösterreich, $NA)

At the base of the pyramid, this lovely Grüner Veltliner bubbly stood out, and it does right by the “classic” moniker in its balanced texture, ample freshness, and juxtaposition of crisp apple-like goodness and spicy, bread-like aromas. It’s sometimes tough to find this kind of interplay between fun and seriousness in entry-level-ish bubbles, but this one delivers handily (and you get a vintage wine, to boot).

 

Reserve

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)2015 Weingut Müller-Grossmann ‘MG’ Brut Nature Reserve (Niederösterreich, $NA)

This 60% Weißburguner / 40% Welschriesling blend saw 18 months of lees aging, but the base wine must have started with raging acidity because there’s a lovely transparency and vibrancy throughout despite all of that yeast contact. Apples, citrus, and an easy-to-love palate finish things off right.

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA) 

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)NV Weingut Willi Bründlmayer Blanc de Blancs Sekt Extra Brut Reserve
(Niederösterreich, $NA)

I don’t an exact USD price on this, but it ain’t cheap; it’s status as Reserve rather than Grosse Reserve is more a function of timing and legal requirements – it has GR written all over it. Four years on the lees give this sparkler baked apples and brioche galore, but the core of the palate is bracing, mineral, lemony, focused, and fresh. It’s a stellar achievement and a gauntlet-throw challenge to Franciacorta and even Champagne.

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA) 

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)2014 Josef Dockner Rose Brut Sekt Reserve (Niederösterreich, $NA)

Pinot Noir and Zweigelt combine here to deliver red berries, earthiness, citrus peel, and overall enticement. Yes, it has some age on it now, but that doesn’t at all derail the full-on mouth party of red fruits that make up its mouthfeel. This one could convert many a Sekt skeptic (Sektic?).

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)

Grosse Reseve

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)NV Weingut Fred Loimer Langenlois Blanc de Blancs Brut Nature Grosse Reserve (Langenlois, $NA)

Loimer is not stranger to the Sekt game, which is probably not an insubstantial contributing factor as to why this Brut Nature Chardonnay take on the tippy-top of the new g.U. pyramid is so ridiculously good. Perky, lively, peachy, and floral to start, then moving into baked apples, baked bread, and just a ton of smile-inducing coherence.

 

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)2014 Buchegger Blanc de Blancs Extra Brut Sekt Grosse Reserve (Niederösterreich, $NA)

While there’s no shortage of bold, autolytic yeasty-ness on this all-Chardonnay stunner, but the big takeaway is its ver, very fine mousse. Above everything else that it has going on, this BdB is pretty, and just oozes elegance in every aspect of its presentation.

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA) 

Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA)2014 Leth Blauburgunder Brut Sekt Grosse Reserve (Niederösterreich, $NA)

There are the telltale aspects of excellent Pinot Noir bubbles on Leth’s GR – freshness, floral notes, hints of citrus peel and red fruits… BUT… there are surprises, too, like touches of lime pith, green apples, and wet stones. Importantly, this is über-focused and lazer-like in the mouth, without being forceful or sacrificing its prettiness or loveliness.

Cheers!

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at Sektarian (Tasting through the New Austrian Sekt Pyramid for NVWA) from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For September 2, 2019

I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes in a “mini-review” format.
 
They are meant to be quirky, fun, and (mostly) easily-digestible reviews of (mostly) currently available wines (click here for the skinny on how to read them), and are presented links to help you find them, so that you can try them out for yourself. Cheers!

Grab The 1WineDude.com Tasting Guide and start getting more out of every glass of wine today!

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For September 2, 2019 from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)

An imposing landscape, in most senses of the word

It’s in Israel‘s north, along the borders with Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan, where you realize that you’re definitely not in Kansas anymore, Toto, viticulturally-speaking. Actually, let’s correct that – it’s not just viticulturally-speaking, it’s just-about-everything-speaking.

Certainly the rocky hills in the Golan Heights and Galilee speak to Israel’s unique location as a transition zone between the Sahara and Europe, with the requisite variations in soils (from volcanic, to terra rossa, to chalk, to te dessert-like Les), climate, and elevation; you know, the standard grape-growing stuff.

But while that sort of geological and climatic scene is mirrored in many wine regions across the globe, there aren’t many that are surrounded by imposing barbed wire fencing, dotted with even more imposing signs warning of land mines, and sporting the occasional airfield patrolled by very imposing drones.

Welcome to wine-growing, northern Israeli-style. It wouldn’t be for the faint-hearted even without the explosives.

As a wrap-up finale on Israeli wine, here are highlights from my not-so-recent media tour there, which culminated in trips to some of the most promising producers in the Golan Heights and Lower Galilee…

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2015 Chateau Golan Syrah (Golan Heights, $NA)

At 8,000 cases a year, with a penchant for avoiding yeast additions, and privately-owned, Chateau Golan is a bit of an oddity in Israeli wine terms. They’re not kosher, a topic about which winemaker Uri Hetz has much to say. “It drives me nuts,” he told me; “a majority of Israelis are not practicing Jews.” It’s a decision that was, according to Hetz, partly philosophical (“why let a minority dictate to the whole?”) and partly practical (the wines are hand-crafted). In keeping with northern Israel’s imposing landscape, their cellar is a bit like a cross between a charming chai and a small reinforced bunker. Hetz’s take on the Israeli wine market is just as practical as his winemaking approach: “It’s understandable that there isn’t a widely known perception [of Israeli wine] in the world,” he noted; “Israel is a small country, and we’ve only been making wine seriously for thirty years, more or less.”

Chateau Golan’s Syrah mirrors their cellar – equal parts charming (herbal, peppery, juicy, and tinged with red fruits) and imposing (sporting serious freshness, leather, meat, and depth). It’s the kind of wine that, tasted blind, would put a sh*t-eating grin across your face to learn where it was made, as it would have kept you guessing. Tasting back to the 2013 of this was a treat, and suggests a nice, long life ahead for the `15.

  

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2016 Chateau Golan Touriga Nacional (Golan Heights, $NA)

Yep, they’re doing Touriga; yep, they’re doing it well. Floral, meaty, fleshy, and smoky, this is what you’re looking for when you’re reaching for varietal Touriga. There’s nice roundness and completeness to the mouthfeel, too, which doesn’t fall hollow after coming on strong initially. You’ll want flank steak with this (trust me).

  

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2015 Chateau Golan Eliad (Golan Heights, $NA)

This is Ch. Golan’s premium Cabernet (with “maybe four percent Merlot”), a new release with only about 1000 cases made from a two-parcel vineyard selection, seeing 30% new oak. Juicy, young, and very fresh, red fruits and currants dominate, with cassis, bramble, and tobacco playing supporting roles. Both subtlety and poise are on display here.

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2009 Golan Heights Winery Yarden Blanc de Blancs Brut (Galilee, $30)

UC Davis-trained winemaker Victor Shoenfeld oversees one of Israel’s largest wine operations. Golan Heights Winery helped to bring modern winemaking tech to the Israeli wine scene, in an area that was once oak forests (mostly chopped own during Ottoman rule), and now boats grapes as its number two crop (behind apples). The winery oversees 1500 acres of vineyards, with six winemakers, a 5.5 million bottle production, and their own export company. They’re one of the first Israeli producers to be certified sustainable, and the first international producer to achieve the Lodi Rules certification.

GHW’s vines encompass five different types of volcanic soils (with the southern being older and deeper, and the northern being more acidic). Shoenfeld probably has 99 winemaking problems – from leaf-roll, to wild boar, to having to grow their most promising Cabernet grapes near former Syrian army bunkers, to Bedouins stealing their metal fencing – but a lack of diversity in what grapes can be produced is not one of them.Case in point – their Yarden brand Blanc de Blancs bubbles, a traditional, brut-style Chardonnay sparkler from the northern Golan. Full of peaches, brioche, yellow apple, it’s racy AF, combining lemony acidity with elegant creaminess.

 

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2016 Golan Heights Winery Yarden Odem Vineyard Organic Chardonnay (Galilee, $28)

These Chard grapes come from a 1990s-planted, tuff soil vineyard in the northern Golan that is now low-yielding. White flowers, wood spices, pears, lemon, pie crust, toast – it’s all going on here, with an ample shot of vibrancy and excellent length and complexity. The finish is an interplay of jasmine and rich creaminess, and wraps up the whole sexy package.

 

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2013 Golan Heights Winery Yarden Bar’on Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon (Galilee, $90)

A spicy, minty, herbaceous, premium single-vineyard CS release (because, hey, everybody’s gotta have one, right?) that’s dense, dark, smoky, and savory, but also lively, mineral, and plummy. While not lacking in power or structure, my main takeaway was that it was a lovely (though undoubtedly young) sipper.

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2016 Assaf Winery Sauvignon Blanc (Golan Heights, $27)

With its inn-like feel, and lineup of concerts and wine/food events, and cozy cafe-and-cabins setup, the family estate Assaf Winery could have been transplanted right out of California wine country. Winemaker (and son of the winery’s owner and principal vintner) Oren Kedem technically was transplanted from California wine country, having previously worked at Michel-Schlumberger (he now lives on the family property). His sister, a trained chef, handles the restaurant side of their tourist-oriented Kedem Wine Village. The background of the main building on their property reads like a microcosm of the region’s recent history: 400 years ago, it belonged to the Turks, then was converted to a school, and did a short stint as a small Syrian army base.

Assaf’s wines have artisan written all over them, particularly this grassy, herbal, and yet also subtle Sauv Blanc. Melons, ripe pear, and tropical fruits get equal time with apples and citrus, with a textural, lovely mouthfeel throughout. The Kedems spent some time in South Africa, and that influence is noticeable here in the assertiveness of the herbal focus.

 

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2014 Assaf Winery “Rujum 91” Cabernet Sauvignon (Golan Heights, $NA)

Three different volcanic soil plots are farmed for this CS, which spent 17 months in both French and American oak. There’s poise and loveliness to spare in this one; its highlights are tangy red fruits, dark plums, freshness, minerality, and a gentle sprinkling of fresh mint on the nose.

 

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2013 Assaf Winery Moise Single Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon Grand Reserve (Golan Heights, $NA)

Less than 2000 bottles of this reserve red were made, all of it aged for two years in French oak. Spicy, young, and brilliant in its clarity, this is tense, vibrant, and elegant stuff. Plummy and juicy, but also minty and tangy, it has a European heart and a Mediterranean body.

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2016 Tabor Single Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc (Galilee, $NA)

At two million bottles produced annually, Tabor Winery is one of the bigger things going in the Lower Galilee (and in the top five in volume of all Israeli producers), and were founded over 100 years ago (with assistance from Bordeaux’s Lafite Rothschild). Tabor have a bit of a secret weapon in their sharp-as-a-tack, dedicated viticulturist Michal Akerman, who told me “we’re not planting vines, we are planting wine; every week, I’m in every block.”

One such set of blocks, with 40+ year-old, low-yielding vines on chalky basalt soils, is used to create their tropical, fresh, and spicy single-vineyard SB. This is focused, intense stuff, moving from tropical to herbal to vegetal to creamy (the latter courtesy of some lees exposure and barrel fermentation). A serious SB, with serious texture (and ample body).

 

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)

2014 Tabor Sufa (Galilee, $30)

Overachieving at $30? You’d better believe it. This Petite Sirah/Cabernet Sauvignon blend is named after a storm, and it’s a whirlwind of elements that exceed the sum of their parts. Smoke, violets, dried herbs, black fruits, leather, minerals, silk, sexiness, cigars, baking spices – the interplay is impressive, and clearly tailored to the fine dining scene. This one has the freshness and structure to age well, and the power and deliciousness to make waiting on that aging a difficult proposition.

 

Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2)2014 Tabor “Malkiya” Cabernet Sauvignon (Galilee, $60)

This was one of the best reds I tasted throughout Israel, and speaks to the particular, unique potential of the Malkia Mountain area, near the Lebanese border, which sits at over 725 meters in elevation (and a few mere kilometers from the celebrated Chateau Musar). The sils there are a complex mix of rare Eocene-era limestone, called “Bar-kochra.” The vines were planted in 2006, and, according to Akerman, are “very stressed; they need a lot of love,” and jokingly adding that “they were born to suffer – it’s a nice Jewish Cabernet Sauvignon!” The finished product is a minor marvel of texture and tension: ripe plummy fruits, dried herbs, mint, dark sour cherries, wet stones, cigar, black and red currants; it’s powerful, deep, concentrated, dark, structured, and yet not overbearing.

Cheers!

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at Quadrinity of Trinities (Israeli Wine, Part 2) from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For August 26, 2019

I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes in a “mini-review” format.
 
They are meant to be quirky, fun, and (mostly) easily-digestible reviews of (mostly) currently available wines (click here for the skinny on how to read them), and are presented links to help you find them, so that you can try them out for yourself. Cheers!

Grab The 1WineDude.com Tasting Guide and start getting more out of every glass of wine today!

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For August 26, 2019 from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

“Market Places Eat Markets” (Thoughts On “Future-Proofing” Wine)

In the words of Iron Man, “I’ve missed that giddy optimism.”

In this case, the Steve Rogers yang to my Tony Stark ying is Emetry CEO Paul Mabray. I’ve been fortunate enough to call Paul a friend for several years running, and not just because I dig on his penchant for Star Wars-related references in his slide decks; Paul is wicked smart, and we have long shared the view that wine is well into its most competitive market in the entire history of the product (for a real noodle-baker, just consider how long we’ve had that product…!).

Mabray delivered a speech at the recent MUST – Fermenting Ideas Wine Summit in Portugal, in which he discussed the “future-proofing” of wine marketing in general. You can access the whole-shebang of Paul’s slide deck, and/or rely on the very good write-up summary of Maybray’s speech over at The Buyer. I found both to be essential reading for wine marketing/branding/producing types. When discussing the write-up with Paul on Facebook, he remarked to me that “the message is starting to resonate. Now for the next phase, action.”

And that’s where the giddy optimism quote comes in, because this is one of the rare instances where Paul and I happen to disagree…

I have a decidedly less optimistic (okay, fine, bleaker) view of the situation in which wine, as a product category in general, finds itself as of 2019, particularly in the USA; that is to say, precariously balanced at the top of an ugly, precipitous drop. From Mabray’s presentation, we can see that there’s a leveling off of wine consumption generally in the US, after several years of increase that put my home country at the top of the wine buying ladder globally:

“Market Places Eat Markets” (Thoughts On “Future-Proofing” Wine)

It’s too late for any proactive action on the part of the wine biz with respect to Maybray’s insight that “market places eat markets.” In fact, it’s too late for a reactionary action on the part of the wine biz with respect to Mabray’s insights on the current state of the competitiveness of the wine market. The wine biz is now several years behind that 8-ball. On the bright side, my lack of optimism on this topic did land me an interview on NPR, so there’s that…

Anyway… those in the wine business probably now recognize that their competition is not just intra-brand, but inter-product-segment – to wit, here’s a look at another of Maybray’s slides, in which he makes the point very, very clear:

“Market Places Eat Markets” (Thoughts On “Future-Proofing” Wine)

Wine now has to compete with, well, every other semi-luxury consumption item, including weed, and the only people who didn’t see all of that coming were those in the wine business that had a vested interest in not seeing it coming – namely, almost all of the collective wine business.

Hopefully Paul will forgive me for not seeing the picture as rosily as he does; the US wine biz doesn’t exactly have a history of being on the cusp of marketing trends, nor has it been known for deftly navigating the increasingly choppy waters of changing market segments. From my vantage point, (marketing and market) things are (still) probably going to get worse for wine before they get better.

Cheers…?

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Copyright © 2016. Originally at “Market Places Eat Markets” (Thoughts On “Future-Proofing” Wine) from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!

Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For August 19, 2019

I taste a bunch-o-wine (technical term for more than most people). So each week, I share some of my wine reviews (mostly from samples) and tasting notes in a “mini-review” format.
 
They are meant to be quirky, fun, and (mostly) easily-digestible reviews of (mostly) currently available wines (click here for the skinny on how to read them), and are presented links to help you find them, so that you can try them out for yourself. Cheers!

Grab The 1WineDude.com Tasting Guide and start getting more out of every glass of wine today!

Shop Wine Products at Amazon.com

Copyright © 2016. Originally at Wine Reviews: Weekly Mini Round-Up For August 19, 2019 from 1WineDude.com - for personal, non-commercial use only. Cheers!