Vinography Images: The Flavor of Steep

A view down the Sil River takes in the precariously steep vineyards of the Amandi District of the Ribeira Sacra near Galicia, Spain. The Ribeira Sacra in the far northwest of Spain has hosted grapevines since ancient times. The Romans planted grapes here, but as in many parts of the world, the main infrastructure of grape growing came with the Cistercian and Benedictine monks who built some of the most ancient terraces that are still used today to grow, among other things, Mencia, for which the region is famous.

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download this image by right-clicking on the image and selecting “save link as” or “save target as” and then select the desired location on your computer to save the image. Mac users can also just click the image to open the full-size view and drag that to their desktops.

To set the image as your desktop wallpaper, Mac users should follow these instructions, while PC users should follow these.

ORDER THE BOOK:
The work of photographer Jimmy Hayes can be further appreciated in his forthcoming monograph, Veritas, which will be published in 2021 by Abrams Books / Cameron + Company. Pre-order the book from the Abrams web site.

PRINTS:
Fine art prints of this image and others are available from Jimmy Hayes Photography.

ABOUT VINOGRAPHY IMAGES:
Vinography regularly features images for readers’ personal use as desktop backgrounds or screen savers. We hope you enjoy them. Please respect the copyright on these images. These images are not to be reposted on any website or blog without the express permission of the photographer.

The post Vinography Images: The Flavor of Steep appeared first on Vinography.

Vinography Images: Sneaky Barrels

Sometimes you have to just take a load off. Envínate winemaker Laura Ramos, relaxing in the cellar, sporting some psychedelic sneakers. Ribiera Sacra, Spain. Envínate is the collaborative project of four enologist friends who began as consultants but ended up creating their own wine label focused on wines from the Ribeira Sacra and the Canary Islands.

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download this image by right-clicking on the image and selecting “save link as” or “save target as” and then select the desired location on your computer to save the image. Mac users can also just click the image to open the full size view and drag that to their desktops.

To set the image as your desktop wallpaper, Mac users should follow these instructions, while PC users should follow these.

ORDER THE BOOK:
The work of photographer Jimmy Hayes can be further appreciated in his forthcoming monograph, Veritas, which will be published in 2021 by Abrams Books / Cameron + Company. Pre-order the book from the Abrams web site.

PRINTS:
Fine art prints of this image and others are available from Jimmy Hayes Photography.

ABOUT VINOGRAPHY IMAGES:
Vinography regularly features images for readers’ personal use as desktop backgrounds or screen savers. We hope you enjoy them. Please respect the copyright on these images. These images are not to be reposted on any website or blog without the express permission of the photographer.

The post Vinography Images: Sneaky Barrels appeared first on Vinography.

Vinography Unboxed: Week of 7/5/20

Hello, and welcome to my periodic dig through the samples pile. I’m pleased to bring you the latest installment of Vinography Unboxed, where I highlight some of the better bottles that have crossed my doorstep recently.

This week included a couple of wines from an organic and biodynamic producer outside of Barcelona in the Penedes region of Spain. Better known for the Spanish sparkling wine Cava, Penedes has long produced some still wines, but is seeing something of a renaissance in the use of the traditional Cava grapes to make terroir-driven, very interesting white wines. These two from Pares Balta, a family operation with dual sinter-in-law winemakers, are perfect examples of why there is more to Penedes than Cava. Made from Xarel-lo, they sing a beautiful stony song.

Closer to home, the Beacon Hill Riesling from Oregon shows that variety continues to hold promise in the region, while the Wester Reach Chardonnay from DuMOL delivers pretty, lemony goodness for those who enjoy California Chardonnay on the leaner side.

I’ve got two pink wines to share this week, and my favorite of the two was the shockingly pale Raeburn rosé from the Russian River Valley. California winemakers are rarely brave enough to make rosés this pale, but when they do, it pays off, as it does with this wine and its tangy strawberry and watermelon flavors.

Beacon Hill sent along a couple of their single vineyard Pinots this week, both of which were excellent, but even the incredibly tasty Beacon Hill Vineyard bottling didn’t match the spectacular zing of their La Sierra Vineyard Pinot, which was a crystalline wonder of red fruit that would set any Pinot Lover’s heart aflutter.

Last, but not least, I’ve got one more wine from Fattoria Valentina in Abruzzi. Named “Spelt” this entry-level Montepulciano comes with a screwcap closure and perhaps a slight surfeit of wood, but if you like your wines smoky, then this might be for you.

Tasting Notes:

2019 Pares Balta “Calcari” Xarel-lo, Penedes, Spain
Pale greenish gold in color, this wine smells of star fruit and white flowers backed by wet pavement. In the mouth, delicious white flowers and wet chalkboard minerality take on a citrus pith and faint unripe apple quality as the wine cuts a linear path across the palate. There is some weight here, silky textured and slightly voluminous, leaving the impression of a beautiful mineral fog moving across the palate. Excellent. 12.5% alcohol. Closed with a screwcap. Score: around 9. Cost: $24. click to buy.

2019 Pares Balta “Cosmic” Xarel-lo, Penedes, Spain
Pale greenish gold in the glass, this wine smells of melting snow, white flowers and green apple. In the mouth, green apple and white floral flavors are welded to a deeply mineral, wet chalkboard quality that extends to a faint drying, tannic texture as the wine finishes with hints of pomelo pith and chamomile. Gorgeous. Includes 15% Sauvignon Blanc. 14.1% alcohol. Score: between 9 and 9.5. Cost: $20. click to buy.

2019 Beacon Hill “Beacon Hill Vineyard” Riesling, Yamhill-Carlton District, Willamette Valley, Oregon
Pale gold in color, this wine smells of Asian pears and citrus zest. In the mouth, ever-so-faintly-sweet flavors of Asian pear and mandarin orange have a nice snap thanks to excellent acidity. Beautifully balanced and delicious with notes of orange pith lingering in the finish. 12.9% alcohol. Closed with a screwcap. Score: around 9. Cost: $26.

2018 DuMOL “Wester Reach” Chardonnay, Russian River Valley, Sonoma, California
Light yellow-gold in the glass, this wine smells of cold cream and Meyer lemon curd. In the mouth, floral notes of cold cream, lemon curd and white flowers have a wonderful silky texture and a nice acidity to them, with the oak making itself felt solely in the texture of the wine. Supple and delicious. 14.1% alcohol. 3352 cases made. Score: around 9. Cost: $57. click to buy.

2019 Raeburn Rosé, Russian River Valley, Sonoma, California
One of the palest rosés I’ve ever seen from California, this wine is almost colorless with just a whisper of pink to it. It smells of bubblegum and strawberries. In the mouth, juicy strawberry and watermelon flavors mix with a nice citrus twang. There’s not quite as much acidity as I would like, but with a good chill on it this one will be a helluva porch pounder. A blend of 66% Zinfandel, 26% Pinot Noir, 8% Grenache. 13.5% alcohol. 13,000 cases made. Score: between 8.5 and 9. Cost: $20. click to buy.

2019 Balverne “Forever Wild” Rosé of Pinot Noir, Russian River Valley, Sonoma, California
Pale salmon pink in the glass, this wine smells of citrus peel and berries. In the mouth, citrus and unripe strawberry flavors have a bright edge to them thanks to excellent acidity. A touch of bitterness lingers in the finish with citrus and crab apple tartness. 14.1% alcohol. Score: around 8.5. Cost: $24. click to buy.

2018 Beacon Hill “Beacon Hill Vineyard” Pinot Noir, Yamhill-Carlton District, Willamette Valley, Oregon
Medium garnet in the glass, this wine smells of cherry and wet earth. In the mouth, wonderfully earthy notes of cherry and cranberry turn zingy and sour with raspberry brightness in the finish touched by a hint of brown sugar. Excellent acidity and nice herbal notes round out a very pretty wine. 14.2% alcohol. Score: around 9. Cost: $35. click to buy.

2018 Beacon Hill “La Sierra Vineyard” Pinot Noir, Dundee Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon
Medium garnet in color, this wine smells of beautiful fresh raspberries and some floral notes. In the mouth, lovely crystalline flavors of raspberry, sour cherry and redcurrant have a fantastic clarity and mineral backbone to them with hints of herbs and cedar backing up the stony fruit. Gorgeous acidity and texture, with faint, gauzy tannins. Outstanding. 12.9% alcohol. Score: between 9 and 9.5. Cost: $45. click to buy.

2016 Fattoria Valentina “Spelt” Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Abruzzi, Italy
Medium to dark garnet in the glass, this wine smells of black cherry and leather and a touch of woodsmoke. In the mouth, doused campfire flavors are shot through with black cherry and closed in a fist of woody tannins that somewhat dry the mouth. The wine gives the impression of having too much burnt wood influence from the barrel. Good acidity, but a bit too toasty for my taste. 13.5% alcohol. Score: around 8.5. Cost: $20. click to buy.

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Overlooked/Underrated: Godello

My latest missive for VinePair takes a look at a white wine grape, Godello. Its home is Galicia, on the northwest coast of Spain. I’ve got the story behind the grape’s preservation, its more familiar friend, and five bottles to check out. Have a look:

vines at Bodgeas Godeval / photo courtesy Valkyrie Selections

Why Chardonnay Fans Should Consider Godello

You’ve probably heard of the former grape (yeah, duh/doy), which I hope will lead you to the latter. Spoiler alert: the trio of experts I talked to on the importer/somm side all mentioned the Big C white grape when queried about a comp.

Reflecting on this specific question, I had a touch of an existential (wine) crisis/hand-wringing episode:

In hindsight, should I feel conflicted touting a grape’s distinctiveness yet craving a familiar touchstone? Based on the responses, it strikes me as a prescient way to encourage drinkers to opt for Godello. The goal being to define it on its own terms: Godello for Godello’s sake.

(Also see my Valpolicella/Pinot Noir comparisons.)

Anyway, this has passed and I’m good. (For now.)

Finally have a look at the Xagoaza Monastery and Church of San Miguel, restored by Bodegas Godeval and about 300 feet from the new winery.

Overlooked/Underrated: Godello

image via Bodgas Godeval

What’s a wine grape you think is overlooked and underrated? Let me know in the comments. I’ll be curious to see if the grape is something I’ve covered before, and it may serve as a reminder to take another look. And, hey, even famous grapes can seem to fall by the wayside. Or, probably more accurately, fall out of fashion for a small subset of highly opinionated wine drinkers. (Like me.)

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Who Wants a Light, Fresh, Low-Alcohol Organic Spanish White Wine?

I’m always on the lookout for organic white wines. So I was delighted to taste (and take home) the Las Dos Ces Blanco from Spain’s Chozas Carrascal winery. I picked up the bottle at my local wine shop, Grapepoint Wines, for $15. Go to wine tastings at your neighborhood place; it’s a great opportunity to discover new things. (And buy a dang bottle!)

The first thing that caught my attention? This wine was from a region I’d never heard of before: Utel-Requena*. It’s west of Valencia by about 50 miles, taking its name from two neighboring towns. Further label perusal reveals the wine is made from organic grapes. Alright!

Chozas Carrascal Las Dos Ces Blanco 2018

This Spanish white wine is a blend of 80% Macabeo and 20% Sauvignon Blanc. You might know the former grape as Viura from such wines as white Rioja, as well as it’s important role in Cava. While I am a huge fan of pungent, zesty Sauvignon Blanc (like New Zealand’s iconic bottlings), I also like Sauv Blanc as more of a “seasoning” grape. If SB is at times too aggro for your liking, a nice splash of it (like the 20% in the Chozas Carrascal) add some lively flavor and interest.

What else is cool about this wine? It’s no boozy monster. At 12% alcohol it makes for a perfect afternoon wine, excellent with seafood and whatever refreshing situation arises.

Chozas Carrascal’s vineyards are at an elevation ranging from about 2,400 to 2,700 feet. I always like high elevation vines, because they look cool and enjoy cool nights. Those lower temperatures mean more chill grapes that retain that crisp freshness instead of getting it baked out of them.

And now you can chill out with a bottle.

Who Wants a Light, Fresh, Low-Alcohol Organic Spanish White Wine?

Vineyards / Image via Facebook / Chozas Carrascal

*I should mention Bodegas Chozas Carrascal is a Vino de Pago estate, a fairly new (2003) Spanish wine designation. This is actually something I didn’t know about. Folks, I don’t know a lot of things. 

Wine-Searcher does a good job of explaining what it means: rewarding wineries for doing cool things with atypical grapes and/or vineyards falling outside of its demarcated region and/or its rules. So you’ll see the top wines labeled “Vino de Pago” rather than Utel-Requena.

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A Spanish White Wine Labyrinth

I got very ambitious as a reader, picking up a copy of a (nearly) 800-page book. No regrets! I gladly sacrificed some/much sleep to stay up and finish Labyrinth of the Spirits by Carlos Ruiz Zafón. Let’s take a look at my review on Goodreads, shall we?

The Labyrinth of the Spirits by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Engrossing mystery/thriller taking place for the most part in Franco’s Spain. The plot surrounds the disappearance of a high-ranking member of the government and the (extremely) tangled web involving a multitude of people.

Our hero is Alicia, a sort of less mobile, pre-internet Lisbeth Salander. She works for a shadowy government investigative team and is teamed up with a more by-the-book, veteran cop to get to the bottom of this mystery. (Sounds like a cliché, but it doesn’t play out that way.)

I devoured this book. Alicia is a fascinating character and her relationship with Vargas is a good one. The whole plot is like an onion, with layers continually peeled back as it heads to the climax. There’s fascinating detail about Barcelona and the machinations of the fascist state.

I wanted to give this book 5 stars, but thought it went on for too long. There was a “natural” ending but a coda (“Julián’s Book”) continuing the story around the son of one of the main characters was superfluous. I also found one of the characters who functioned (at least after the early parts of the book) as comic relief was a too-broad, corny caricature. I found myself more and more annoyed at his “clever witticisms.”

Finally, for context, when I bought this book I had no idea it was the final entry in a series of four novels. (Whoops!) You can read it as a stand-alone. I will admit to sometimes getting confused about how all the characters were connected, and flipping back and forth in the book. (This would be a good one to read on a Kindle where you could search for names, etc.) Though I’m not sure reading the prior books would have made me sharper on the family trees and connections.

View all my reviews

Pour Yourself a Nice Glass of Spanish White Wine for Labyrinth of the Spirits

A Spanish White Wine Labyrinth

It turns out our hero, Alicia, has quite a thing for Spanish white wine. And, surprisingly, the first glass she enjoys is a white wine from Penedès. Why did I find it unusual she drinks “a good vintage Penedès”?

Because Penedès is Cava country. When I think of wines from the region, I think sparkling. But, hey, sometimes I’m an ignorant dummy. When I was in the Penedès region a few years ago, I discovered a still wine from the region made from one of the main Cava grapes, Xarel-lo. Delicious. A “smooth Penedès” later makes an appearance. (Is it made from Xarel-lo? I dunno, but work with me, folks.)

She shifts (wine) gears slightly for “a glass of Alella white wine.” Which I had to look up. Turns out Alella is super-close to Barcelona, and one of Spain’s oldest and smallest Spanish wine regions. The More You Know!

Finally, the character I found annoying (Fermín) does redeem himself with this breakfast: “He made himself a four-egg omelette with bits of chopped ham and cheese, which he polished off with a half-kilo French loaf and a small bottle of champagne to boot.”

Now I don’t know if this was actually Champagne or just someone calling all sparkling wine (lowercase “c’) champagne. But, regardless, this is a stupendous food and wine pairing. The richness of eggs, the saltiness of ham, gooey cheese, and bread? Bring on the sparkling wine (or Champagne), with its bread dough flavors plus lively fizz and zip to cut through all that dairy, salt, and meat.

Happy reading…and drinking!

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Luzón Verde is a Go-To Organic Spanish Red Wine Bargain

Sometimes when I go to a big wine tasting event like Spain’s Great Match, it’s all about cramming as many new wines into my maw as possible. (RESPONSIBLY.) But often the most memorable tastes are when I revisit an old vinous friend. I fondly recall selling the Luzón Verde, a Spanish red wine made from organic grapes. It was over a decade ago at QFC when I first encountered this wine, thanks to one of my sales reps. It has a great label and comes in a case box replicating said label. That means you can:

Stack it High and Watch it Fly

Which is my favorite retail rhyme next to “If it’s cold, it’s sold” for beer/soda/wine.

Let’s take a closer look.

Old vines at Bodegas Luzón. Pretty amazing, huh? And that rocky soil, damn. / Photo via winery FB page

Luzón Verde Organic 2017 (Jumilla) $12

Luzón Verde is a Go-To Organic Spanish Red Wine BargainBrought to you by Bodegas Luzón, this red is made from the Monastrell grape. You might be more familiar with it as Mourvèdre, which is what the French (and folks beyond) call it. Visiting Australia? (Lucky you, BTW.) Well it could be referred to as Mataro. You gotta love learning about wine!

It’s a rich, juicy red but with enough snap not be overwhelming. Very crowd-pleasing and pleasurable. Even this nerd who loves weedy see-through low ABV Loire Cab Franc (IT ME) digs the Luzón Verde. I mean, what more do you want from a dang 12 dollar wine? It’s tasty, has a bright, fun label, uses organic grapes, and is made from a non-ubiquitous grape variety.

If you see Monastrell from Spain, particularly hailing from Jumilla or Yecla, you’re going to find delicious bargains. Probably from old vines. When it doubt, go for it. I’d also say the same for Garnacha (Grenache) from Spain.

What’s your favorite inexpensive, surprising red wine? Let me know in the comments.

 

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Liquid Geography Rosé is a Feel-Good Wine

I’ve been a fan of a small region in Northwest Spain for quite a while: Bierzo. (I first wrote about the region, albeit quite briefly, in 2005!) The main grape you’ll find there, Mencía, makes great red wines. Now I’m delighted to get into some pink examples. Liquid Geography rosé is the most recent bottle I’ve had. It’s brought to the US by Olé Imports.

The vines that go into this 100% Mencía rosé were planted in 1963, some serious old-vine material. It’s got no oak and sports an easygoing 12.5% alcohol.

Beyond the wine inside, it’s what happens when you buy a bottle of Liquid Geography rosé that makes it special. 100% of the wine’s profits go to charity. The three beneficiaries:

Liquid Geography Rosé is a Feel-Good Wine

Great wine and great causes, what’s not to love? Wine-searcher has the average price for the 2017 vintage as $11. So I’d add “great price” to the prior sentence as well.

I was joking in my newsletter (why not subscribe?) that I was going to write about rosé for a week after having three of the last four posts here about pink wine. If you missed them:

Why are Rosé Bottles Crazy with Shapes and Packaging?

Provence Rosé Podcast

Rodney Strong Vineyards Rosé is Pinot Noir Pleasure

That lasted a day. So as the kids like to say, #sorrynotsorry.

All images via Olé Imports.

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I Praise This Wine Without Using Exclamation Points

I am so guilty of abusing exclamation points. If you read the “About Me” section of this very blog, I even confess/brag about it. I refer to my predilection as deploying an “overabundance” of them.

A quote from F. Scott Fitzgerald has stuck with me:

“An exclamation point is like laughing at your own joke.”

In this crazy day and age of texting and social media, not using an exclamation point can come across as sarcastic, cold, or detached. You type “Congratulations!!!” rather than “Congratulations.”

In The Guardian, Elena Ferrante, author of the excellent 4-book series Neapolitan Novelstakes on the exclamation point, saying:

“Of all the punctuation marks, it’s the one I like the least. It suggests a commander’s staff, a pretentious obelisk, a phallic display. An exclamation should be easily understood by reading; there’s no need to insist with that mark at the end as well.” 

Later:

“But I still think that ‘I hate you’ has a power, an emotional honesty, that ‘I hate you!!!’ does not.”

I highly recommend reading the whole column because it makes serious points about language, meaning, and power.

Inspired by Ferrante, I would like to talk about a wine. This is much less serious matter, but here I go.

I like this wine. It’s really good.

Siete Red (No Exclamation Points)

I Praise This Wine Without Using Exclamation PointsFirst of all, I dig this label. So. Much. I am very tempted to finish a sentence about it with a punctuation mark that would convey an exuberant mood. Furthermore, I might repeat the use of this mark three to five times for maximum impact.

Sigh.

The Siete Red is from Rioja. It’s a blend of 80% Tempranillo, 10% Garnacha, and 10% Mazuelo. The grapes are organic, which is great. Due to  no oak being involved, this Spanish wine is very welcoming and open. But the Siete is beyond pleasant, with a little bit of earthiness that leads to a spicy, fruity kick of a finish.

Who wouldn’t love to bring this wine to a party because it just looks so cool? Everyone would pour themselves a glass. Additionally, it’s not too pricey. I got it for 14 bucks at Dandelion Wine.

If you’re also a fan of label design and some of the considerations both artistic and practical behind their creation, please read my Q&A with Randall Grahm of Boon Doon Vineyards. Or find out what five graphic designers thought of another Spanish wine label. Finally, get to know a creative agency that chimed in on a label and wine I dig.

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Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus

I had the good fortune last week to be invited to lunch with Bertrand Sourdais, the dynamic 5th generation winemaker and owner of Domaine de Pallus in Chinon, smack dab in the middle of the Loire Valley. He pulls double duty as a partner and winemaker of two wineries in Spain’s Ribero del Duero region.

Bertrand Sourdais

“Thrilling, brilliant” are adjectives that have applied to the wines crafted by Bertrand Sourdais. Although his family estate is in Chinon in the Loire Valley, he made his international reputation with a Spanish wine, the 2002 Dominio de Atauta “Llanos del Almendro,” from Spain’s Ribera del Duero. In a celebrated blind tasting organized by two Europe’s most respected wine critics, Bertrand’s 2002 Atauta tied with the 1994 Vega Sicilia’s Unico, beating out the 2000 Château Latour; this was a shocking result as it was Bertrand’s first commercial vintage as winemaker.

Check out this Video of the vineyards!

Just after graduating from Enology school in Bordeaux, Bertrand apprenticed at Mouton-Rothschild, Santa Rita in Chile and Alvaro Palacios in Priorat. Bertrand took his first post as winemaker at Atauta in Ribero del Duero. After he left Atauta, Bertrand started Bodegas Antidoto and Dominio de ES, both in Ribera del Duero.

At lunch, Bertrand revealed that he was fired by the new owners of Atauta back in 2008. Even though he did not elaborate, the firing must have been a dramatic turning point in his life and, thirteen years on, you can still see it in his eyes. It still hurts. Yet I believe that the firing ignited a passionate determination to work only for himself with a fierce drive to succeed.

Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus
ANTIDOTO RIBERA DEL DUERO 2014 92 WA

So he founded a new winery, with partner David Hernando, an agronomist, called Antidoto. Antidoto means antidote and it was just the perfect cure for Bertrand’s Atauta blues. It was no coincidence that they located Antidoto in the Soto de San Esteban zone in the Soria province, just a stone’s throw from Atauta!

Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus
Duero Vines

At the same time, Bertrand’s father wanted to retire and to turn the estate in Chinon over to Bertrand. Bertrand was eager to take the reins of his family estate in addition to his commitment in Ribera del Duero. Bertrand told me he drives 8 hours each way from Pallus to Antidoto and back. That determined dedication is impressive and I think it is fueled by his traumatic firing from Atauta nearly ten years ago. Those wounds are still raw to this day.

Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus

Chinon is a prestigious appellation, mostly for Cabernet Franc, located in the center of the Loire Valley. It produces some of France’s meatiest Cabernet Francs which are sometimes compared to Bordeaux. As this is Bertrand’s home, his family estate, Domaine de Pallus, takes pride of place over his Spanish estates.

Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus

Bertrand farms his vineyards organically, using biodynamic treatments. Yields are kept low, sometimes too low (under 1 ton/acre!).

Below are the wines we tasted with Bertrand.Tasting with Loire Valley Superstar Bertrand Sourdais of Domaine de Pallus

Pallus 2014 Les Pensées de Pallus: Les Pensées boasts a dark ruby color with aromas of dried herbs, anise and rosemary. On the palate, there is medium-to-full bodied fruit of tart black plum, black currant, black tea and bright acidity leading to a vibrant mineral finish. In stock at Esquin.

We also tasted, for the first time:

Pallus 2016 Les Messanges: Bertrand’s entry level Chinon, the. This is delightful fruity wine of elegance and balance. Available soon.

Antidoto 2015 Ribera del Duero: this is 100% Tinto Fino (Tempranillo) produced from grapes from the Soto de San Esteban zone in the Soria province, the cooler part of Ribera del Duero. Just released, this is a serious wine that can age. Available soon.

Pallus 2017 Messanges Chinon Rosé: A dry, crisp Cabernet Franc rosé perfect for Spring and Summer drinking. Fire up the outdoor grill! Available soon.

Antidoto 2017 Roselito Ribera del Duero: This complex Rosé is produced from 80% Tinto Fino and 20% Albillo Mayor, a little known local white grape indigenous to Ribera del Duero. Available soon.

Click for a Fact Sheet with more information on Bertrand Sourdais

arnie@esquin.com

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